Tommy & the Gulliver

Some time ago I found a couple of early advertisements of a couple of cheaper Crackajack Mouth Organs that were offered in their product range, The Tommy Dodd (1903-06) and the Little Gulliver (1903-12). I cannot conclusively establish how the naming of these was contrived, but I would like to suggest it was of prominent … Continue reading Tommy & the Gulliver

A Crackajack Story

1897 - F A Rauner of Klingenthal, Germany register their Cracker Jack name # 28285. Sold six years later in Australia as Crackajack with same reg #.1899 - F A Rauner had The Scorcher models in the market place in Australia sold by Feldheim, Gotthelf & Co of Sydney and The Bushman sold by W … Continue reading A Crackajack Story

Kilburn Queen

I’m a Crackajack man (nobody knows or understands). Have to be, being born in Melbourne. Boomerangs were Sydney - sold by J Albert & Son. Crackajacks were vended in Melbourne by Allan & Co. This affinity originated with the find of an early Crackajack Concert Grand on a family holiday in Rye and it sent … Continue reading Kilburn Queen

Two Jacks

Riff Raffer Mark Hand has been assisting the author with photos of Aussie harps both from within his own wild and wonderful collection and from the Harmonica museum in Trossingen, Germany. He planned another visit to the museum and asked which harmonicas I was seeking. One of many mentioned was the Topnotcher, which Mark had … Continue reading Two Jacks

Aussie Models-Timeline

A timeline of Australian models (an attempt), as promised a while back. No no no, not that type of model, sorry! Australian brand harmonicas up to WWII. Like this.1890’s-The Scorcher (F A Rauner/Feldheim, Gotthelf & Co)-up to 1920 1895/99-The Melba (?/H S Chipman-TM 1895), Crack A Jack (F A Rauner?/?) 1896-Woolloomooloo Warbler (Seydel/Alberts) originally had … Continue reading Aussie Models-Timeline

Quest For The Maker

Hi Riff Raffers The epic journey set out on the first of October, 2018. The trekking party consisted of Pat Missin, Ray Grieve and myself. We were in search of a gold nugget. Just as George Leavis Allan had done in 1853 when he took out a gold licence (#88) and went prospecting at Campbell’s … Continue reading Quest For The Maker