Moppetry Hogwash

A recent acquisition to my harmonica ephemera is Aussie (and American) Gene Jimae’s program handout displaying some great illustrations and information. I had to look up ‘moppetry’ a term not frequently used in today’s vernacular. Its reference is to childhood. I have no idea of the meaning of ‘sock results’ mentioned later in the pamphlet. … Continue reading Moppetry Hogwash

Fluted Harps

My recently acquired Crackajack Artist had me delving into the world of harps with fluted covers. The Crackajack Artist (1926) manufactured by F A Rauner is shaped like their fluted World Master mouth organ. ‘Down Under’ we also had the Rozella (1913) by F A Bohm and the Perla (1926) both with fluted cover plates. … Continue reading Fluted Harps

Deane’s Sticka

W J Deane in 1896 were selling both the Woolloomooloo Warbler and the Kangaroo Chalmer. In ‘97 they advertised the newly invented Native Waratah and Boomerang mouth organs and in ‘98 Deane And Son had their own model The Bugler for a Bob. I had initially thought The Bugler mouth organ may have been produced … Continue reading Deane’s Sticka

Schokolade & Adelaide

An early advertisement in the Colony for a Mundharmonika at R Clisby’s Musical Repository in Rundle Street Adelaide. It appears in the South Australian newspaper the Sud Australishe Zeiting in 1862. South Australia had a large intake of German settlers in the 19th Century, so much so that they represented 10% of all South Australians … Continue reading Schokolade & Adelaide

Bush Piano Interlude

At last, a Boomerang tin of the mouth organ variety to sit in the Shep Dawg collection. Sometimes just collecting the tins can be as much fun as for the item inside. Only paid a blue swimmer and a pink lady. Cheap at half the price! Found an advertisement for Bush Piano mouth organs (three … Continue reading Bush Piano Interlude

Tommy & the Gulliver

Some time ago I found a couple of early advertisements of a couple of cheaper Crackajack Mouth Organs that were offered in their product range, The Tommy Dodd (1903-06) and the Little Gulliver (1903-12). I cannot conclusively establish how the naming of these was contrived, but I would like to suggest it was of prominent … Continue reading Tommy & the Gulliver

A Crackajack Story

1897 - F A Rauner of Klingenthal, Germany register their Cracker Jack name # 28285. Sold six years later in Australia as Crackajack with same reg #.1899 - F A Rauner had The Scorcher models in the market place in Australia sold by Feldheim, Gotthelf & Co of Sydney and The Bushman sold by W … Continue reading A Crackajack Story

Within Coo-ee

Photo courtesy of Pittwater Online News In 1898 Johs Richter trademarked both the Coo-ee and Kookaburra name for mouth organs. Seydel took over the name of Kookaburra and produced them and in 1910 they trademarked the name Coo-ee for mundharmonikas. We know one exists (just beyond coo-ee) as the owner, the editor of the Pittwater … Continue reading Within Coo-ee

Bush King

Kookaburra sits on the old gum tree, Merry merry king of the bush is he. Laugh, Kookaburra, laugh, Kookaburra, Gay your life must be! (Kookaburra Mouth Organ from Doug Dawson’s collection) The name Kookaburra has its derivation from the indigenous Wiradjuri word Guuguubarra, which is onomatopoeic for the bird's distinctive laughter call. To many they … Continue reading Bush King

Kilburn Queen

I’m a Crackajack man (nobody knows or understands). Have to be, being born in Melbourne. Boomerangs were Sydney - sold by J Albert & Son. Crackajacks were vended in Melbourne by Allan & Co. This affinity originated with the find of an early Crackajack Concert Grand on a family holiday in Rye and it sent … Continue reading Kilburn Queen